Students, Fellows & Staff

Luke Bogart
Graduate Student, Program in Neuroscience
bogart@fas.harvard.edu
Luke is interested in understanding how the effects of experience-dependent plasticity are consolidated as structural changes to the nervous system. Currently, he is using imaging techniques to investigate how the axonal arbors of parvalbumin-positive basket cells mature following periods of both normal and altered development. Luke holds a BS in Brain & Cognitive Sciences from the University of Rochester, where he also minored in Psychology.

Nadine Gogolla
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
ngogolla@mcb.harvard.edu
Nadine’s research investigates the mechanisms underlying the postnatal development of multisensory integration in the mouse neocortex, with a special focus on models of neurodevelopmental disorders. Nadine graduated from the University of Marburg in Germany and performed her PhD studies in the lab of Prof. Pico Caroni at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Switzerland.

Ryoma Hattori
Graduate Student, Molecules, Cells and Organisms Program
rmatsui@fas.harvard.edu
Ryoma is interested in cross-modal plasticity associated with sensory loss in early life. He is investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the critical period of cross-modal plasticity in the visual cortex. He received his BS in Biophysics and Biochemistry from the University of Tokyo in Japan.

Yohei Kobayashi
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Yohei.Kobayashi@childrens.harvard.edu
Yohei is using molecular, genetic, and electrophysiological techniques to understand how brain function is shaped by genes and environment in early life. He joined the lab after a decade of studying biology at Kyoto University in Japan, where he received his PhD.

Hing Cheong (Henry) Lee
Postdoctoral Fellow, F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital
hingcheong.lee@childrens.harvard.edu
Henry is interested in the role of parvalbumin neural circuits in the control of brain plasticity, and in translating this knowledge into better treatments for neurological disorders. Currently he is studying how the homeoprotein Otx2, a critical factor in the maturation of parvalbumin neurons, is regulated in the developing brain. Henry received his BSc and MPhil from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and his PhD from University College London, where he worked with Prof. Stephen Moss.

Mari Nakamura
Associate, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
nmari@mcb.harvard.edu
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Annarita Patrizi
Postdoctoral Fellow, F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Boston Children’s Hospital
annarita.patrizi@childrens.harvard.edu
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Kathleen Quast
Graduate Student, Program in Neuroscience
kquast@fas.harvard.edu
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Rebecca Reh
Graduate Student, Program in Neuroscience
reh@fas.harvard.edu
Rebecca is interested in how sleep influences the developing brain—specifically, how sleep itself changes over development and in turn affects experience dependent developmental processes. Her thesis work focuses on how sleep restriction impacts the ability of the brain to adapt to changes in the visual environment. Rebecca completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Washington, studying circadian regulation of sleep in the lab of Dr. Horacio de la Iglesia.

Tania Rinaldi Barkat
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
trinaldi@mcb.harvard.edu
Tania is interested in understanding the development and function of neuronal circuits at a system level in health and disease. Currently Tania is investigating the development of neuronal circuits during the critical period of plasticity in the mouse auditory cortex. She completed her graduate studies in Prof. Henry Markram’s lab at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland.

Anne Takesian
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
anne.takesian@childrens.harvard.edu
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Eun-Jin Yang
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
ejyang@mcb.harvard.edu
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Zhanlei Ye
Graduate Student, Program in Neuroscience
zye@fas.harvard.edu
Zhanlei is interested in the function and modulation of neuronal circuits. Currently she is using physiological tools to investigate how circuits are shaped by early life experiences. Zhanlei received her bachelor’s degree in Medical Sciences from Peking University.